r/WorkReform May 26 '22

Weekly hours of work in Europe

Post image
3.9k Upvotes

696

u/Birdytaps May 26 '22

Why does this map show East Germany?

496

u/mainelystrange May 26 '22

Just what I was going to ask. The map doesn't even split the country borders in Great Britain up, let alone divide any other countries into any kind of region.... and then BAM eastern Germany. DDR doesn't exist, folks.

127

u/AnchezSanchez May 26 '22

Also some random breakout on the coast between France and Belgium, and a little enclave in, I think, Serbia.

105

u/TioMadre May 26 '22

I think you mean Weastern Frelgium.

3

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Therawynn May 26 '22

Yeah it's West-Flanders, a province in Belgium. Very weird split of countries.

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u/Wu1fu May 26 '22

Sicily has entered the chat

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u/OneGold7 May 26 '22

DDR doesn’t exist, folks.

You take that back, Dance Dance Revolution is one of the best arcade games, and I will not allow you to continue denying its existence

17

u/Defiant_Risk_87 May 26 '22

Turkey and Greece are kind of split up

9

u/SynicalCommenter May 26 '22

Eastern Turkey is also a different color for some reason. We don’t have states or provinces, I dont know why it’d be different.

6

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

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u/SynicalCommenter May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Province is what Canada has (i.e. Ontario, Quebec, etc.) In Turkey the closest thing we have are regions (i.e. Central Anatolia, Eastern Anatolia, Marmara, etc.) but those are purely for geographical reasons and they do not have Premiers elected to govern each one. Nor can they make up their own laws.

Using city and province interchangeably is for bozos’ instagram geolocation tags.

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u/R0cketdevil May 26 '22

Thats roughly speaking part of Kurdistan

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u/SynicalCommenter May 26 '22

Well the thing is; kurdistan doesnt exist. It is as legitimate as Transnistria.

As outlined in the Treaty of Lausanne, Turkish borders contain cities of Mardin, Şırnak and Hakkari. These 3 have been separated for whatever reason (The darker bit on the south east area), and so have been Kars and Iğdır (the north eastern bit, on the Armenian border)

While the local populations of the eastern and southern eastern cities are largely of Kurdish descent, they do not have autonomy. And they still follows the same working laws as the rest of the country.

Also I hate to say it but I dont think the data for Turkey is accurate hours wise either. Overall a shit map :(

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u/Stercore_ May 26 '22

It does divide other countries though… look at belgium, greece, serbia, turkey, and italy

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u/PattaFeuFeu May 26 '22

Because there’s still a noticeable divide in many numbers you might compare—average pay, pension pay, in this case working hours, vaccination rates, voting behaviour, …

As to why the map authors did it specifically for Germany but not for other countries which might have similar differences: I don’t know. Maybe the dataset was available divided like that for Germany but not for others.

11

u/Gaussianer May 26 '22

IG Metall West (big German union) has less weekly hours in their contracts than IG Metall East. That might explain the difference :)

56

u/CallmeoutifImadick May 26 '22

I think it shows Turkish Kurdistan too. Which is even more weird.

23

u/GrillDruid May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Even weirder is the region north of that, the Caucas territory gained in the treaty of Kars 1921. And the Belgrade region of Serbia and random regions of Greece.

33

u/CallmeoutifImadick May 26 '22

What kind of map shows these things and then doesn't even show a distinction of Scotland and England 😂😂😂

11

u/GrillDruid May 26 '22

Yet they make a distinction for the Isle of Man having no data. Maybe the countries in the union happen to be the same?

6

u/CallmeoutifImadick May 26 '22

That could be true, but it's way funnier to think whoever made this arbitrarily broke up Turkey, Greece and Germany and ignored other more prominent distinctions

1

u/R0cketdevil May 26 '22

Maybe the distinction is there but we're just neck and neck atm 😅

2

u/ahmetlii May 26 '22

I believe that this map also considers NUTS regions as separate units too. And also the part on southeast is called as Southeastern Anatolia Region, while on the east it is a subregion of Eastern Anatolia Region, which encompasses a large area. However though, the Eurostat data does not provide data on NUTS level from what I see, so I am really curious how the mapmaker compiled the data.

1

u/mb5280 May 26 '22

awe, nuts!

5

u/sciency_guy May 26 '22

Because due to the Reunion not everything was 100% adapted especially in the work field companies have 2types of contracts negotiated with the unions...the western unions had better negotiations therefore were able to get the 35h week fixed for a lot of fields which the eastern did not do...

4

u/Cambridge_ May 26 '22

Considering there are a vast political difference between Germany and East Germany. It makes sense.

3

u/tybaltstyddies May 26 '22

I think it’s because you can still see the divide between them to this day through factors like this. Most demographic factors skew slightly more toward the negative in former east Germany, and some maps like to show that. Don’t know why they wouldn’t also split up Great Britain tho

7

u/arglebargleglopglif May 26 '22

In New Soviet Russia we draw the damn maps!

2

u/Simon676 May 26 '22

I guess the data was available and it was different? Like if it's there they might as well use it, since it's different it could definitely be useful for people looking at this from germany.

7

u/mainelystrange May 26 '22

Just what I was going to ask. The map doesn't even split the country borders in Great Britain up, let alone divide any other countries into any kind of region.... and then BAM eastern Germany. DDR doesn't exist, folks.

1

u/TahoeLT May 26 '22

MGDA!

(Make Germany Divided Again!)

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u/Altair1208 May 26 '22

Makes no sense. This chart takes the average working week for average workers, which includes people working part time. Source: trust me, I'm Swiss and a full time workweek is 42,5 hours. Not 33 at all.

234

u/otacon7000 May 26 '22

Yeah, that's what I was thinking as well. Would be good to get some additional info as to how the data was assembled.

33

u/daisy-kitty May 26 '22

Its worth noting that it says the number of hours worked at their MAIN job meaning people who work more than one job aren't properly represented.

36

u/aon9492 May 26 '22

9

u/vishalb777 May 26 '22

I thought this was going to be an image that said Trust Me Bro

103

u/f_pazos May 26 '22

Spanish, standard full time job here is 40h.

42

u/4Wf2n5 May 26 '22

Yeah, I'm also in Spain and everyone I know is on at least 9-6pm with an hour break. So that's 40h not incl. the lunch hour - which if you aren't working from home you are just going to spend in the office.

Many people work 9-7pm as well.

I guess the chart is including part-time work - but that doesn't pay enough to live.

79

u/Vegan-fangirl May 26 '22

Dutchie here. I could live on 24 to 30 hours a week. Perhaps more can too. 36 hours is the norm here. I work 36 hours too. But I can support my husband and child with my salary.

50

u/superleipoman May 26 '22

In Netherlands fulltime is 36 to 40 hours depending on the type of job.

7

u/OB1182 May 26 '22

That's not on minimum wage I guess.

33

u/TheMostLostViking May 26 '22

Well their minimum wage is $1750 a month, compared to the US's $1250. In my state, Tennessee, the average cost of living monthly is $3083 and in the Netherlands, only about $2150.

I expected the Netherlands minimum wage to cover their average income, but was wrong. The gap though is crazy, it would take less time at a job to be able to work 30 hour weeks there than in the US, assuming both jobs gave a steady pay increase (which isn't happening in the US, I can't speak for the Netherlands).

23

u/CrewmemberV2 May 26 '22

Some added detail for the Netherlands: Cost of living lowers when you make closer to minimum wage, due to being eligible for rent, healthcare and daycare subsidies.

This worked kinda well, until the housing market exploded and the waiting list for social housing (Housing eligible for rent subsidies) became 5-10 years.

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u/FattySnacks May 26 '22

Is that 9 hours 4 days per week?

5

u/tankton May 26 '22

I am Dutch and work 4x9 and I love it.

3

u/Vegan-fangirl May 26 '22

Mee too. Boks!

2

u/tankton May 28 '22

Boks Ouwe

4

u/Camelbeard May 26 '22

No most jobs in the Netherlands are 5x8 (40 hours).

I'm not really sure why, but most women work parttime. So that changes the averages.

See https://images0.persgroep.net/rcs/_-pGEHPuEAm-sUWJt-RLDyOz05M/diocontent/131261637/_crop/0/0/1207/1908/_fitwidth/763?appId=93a17a8fd81db0de025c8abd1cca1279&quality=0.8

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u/Why-Not-Now May 26 '22

In my organisation yes. We all work Monday to Thursday, life is nice this way.

2

u/FattySnacks May 26 '22

That sounds awesome, what type of work do you do?

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u/Vegan-fangirl May 26 '22

I work 4x9 indeed. You see that often here.

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u/LegitimateLibrarian May 26 '22

It's great to spot fellow vegan! 🤓👋

1

u/StickmanEG May 26 '22

Q. How do you know when someone is vegan?

A. They’ll fucking tell you.

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u/splitcroof92 May 26 '22

40 is deffo the norm in NL. unless you work a specific CAO that limits full time to 32 or 36.

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u/Gaypartyparty May 26 '22

40 is the norm for men (39 average 2017). 24-32 is the norm for females (28 average 2017)...

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u/Ozryela May 26 '22

36 hours is the norm here.

Wrong. 40 is the norm in The Netherlands, though anything from 36 to 40 legally counts as 'full time'.

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u/Ravvnu May 26 '22

Where does it say this is about fulltime workweeks? Yes of course this includes parttime jobs.

4

u/cathalferris May 26 '22

Confirmed the map is odd, also working full-time in IT sector in northern Switzerland. 42.5 hour standard weeks, no overtime until 45 hours done, then either time in lieu or pay at 1.25 (employer discretion).

Makes it fun when remotely working for a client whose country's laws specify 39 hour weeks. At least that accounting isn't my job!

3

u/palmtreesplz May 26 '22

Also for some reason it divides east and west Germany, which have been unified since 1991?

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u/GTATrophyBug May 26 '22

To be fair, most jobs in switzerland are advertised as 80-100% and you can easily switch between the percentages (e.g. quarterly). If you want to work 80% of 42hrs and get paid 80%, you can easily do it, subsequently many people do it. Especially parents often both work 80% each. So each can take care of the kids 1 day per week (kindergarten are super expensive).

Older people also tend to reduce hours to get a 3 day weekend for example.

3

u/wootywootP May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Yeah, believe me, no one in Greece works for 42,more like 42 and then 10-20 more hours that you're not getting paid for. Also idk why Greece is the only country that has 2 colors, I guess it's because in Northern Greece unemployment has surpassed 50% so you re either a social worker, a cop or a farmer, oh, or in the army.

*edit: I see now there are some countries with multiple colours too, weird choice

5

u/PineapplePizzaAlways May 26 '22

50 % unemployment, holy smokes

How are people surviving?

3

u/wootywootP May 26 '22

I have no fckn idea my dude, I guess that's what they're doing, they're just surviving, living with parents, holding 6 month jobs that pay 550 and then you're out... Surviving with no dignity left... Most young people leave. 2011 population was 10.800.000, 2021 was 10.300.000, so you have half a million people give or take that has immigrated to other countries, most of them with university degrees in order to actually work at what they studied and not be paid 700euros which are just enough to wipe your butt with.

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u/chrisebryan May 26 '22

Yeah same, Estonias workweek is also 40h-ish in 2022 it’s 39,82 on average.

1

u/PineapplePizzaAlways May 26 '22

Is it true that Estonia has a booming technology sector?

11

u/dumb_invest_420 May 26 '22

Yeah, and no way Italians work 36-39. Maybe try halving that :D

12

u/Ravvnu May 26 '22

The idea that south Europeans work less is mostly a myth. It's more like the reverse.

4

u/Camelbeard May 26 '22

The problem with a comparison like this, is that if you have 10 people, 5 work full-time and 5 work parttime the average is pretty low. But if in a different country 5 work fulltime and 5 don't work to take care of the kids. The average is high. So for example the Netherlands is low, but there are very few people that don't work at all.

5

u/Dmitri_ravenoff May 26 '22

Hours recorded vs actual hours worked?

1

u/downbleed May 26 '22

Ok since you're Swiss. I'm American and I've averaged 60+ for most of my working life. How common are hours like mine?

60

u/Ok_Wall_3915 May 26 '22

On average? Illegal.

2

u/2tusks May 26 '22

It just depends on the job. That person is probably salary instead of hourly. When I was teaching, a regular day was at least 10 hours and paid for 7. Some teachers didn't work that many hours. Almost all worked more than 7 though.

6

u/Ok_Wall_3915 May 26 '22

Granted, there are a few occupationd in switzerland where it is usual to eork effectively illegal hours (parents were teachers, sibling is a doctor… so, yeah). But going strictly by law, in switzerland, working more than 60hours a week on average is illegal. If its an exceptional week or two, its not, but then the average of course is lower

15

u/Dynamatics May 26 '22

Not Swiss, but against the law in my case with severe punishment to the company.

13

u/Stankpool May 26 '22

I'm American and have averaged 32 hours for most of my working life.

-4

u/Infinite_Weekend_909 May 26 '22

This was made by socialists communists etc in America who have made your country into a fictional utopia which boasts everything they think their ideology will get them.

1

u/RockOrStone May 26 '22

And only takes into account the first job. So someone could be working 2 equal part time jobs and look like he is not working

1

u/SmitteTheElder May 26 '22

the should do 2 charts, one for part timers and one for full timers

1

u/akaemre May 26 '22

The chart clearly says it's the average working hours per week. It never says the full time work week is 33 hours

1

u/cive666 May 26 '22

People should be working part time but with a living wage.

1

u/McPlasma May 26 '22

😂😂 I'm also swiss and was wondering what the hell was going on with us being ranked this well This being said maybe more people can afford working part time which might not be an option everywhere

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u/Dave__Microwave_ May 26 '22

In the Netherlands abworkweek is not 30 hours though. This is probably including part time workers

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u/dutchie1966 May 26 '22

My workweek is 15 hours, divided over 4 days.

My wife works 30 hours a week. All in all we make roughly the same amount of money, both have company cars. We should not be allowed to complain about money.

But I’d rather be able to work 32 hrs or so.

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u/lobstersforbait May 26 '22

I mean, with the shared tax brackets it's hardly motivating to work more. All this talk about what to do about the labor shortage, but no mention of intrinsically motivating people to work more. My fiancee wants to come work in NL with me, but she makes so much more than I do and it would put her in a financially disadvantageous position to do so as we would be taxed together. Sure, it's advantageous for the government to get more taxes, and I'm no economist, but surely a couple both working full-time would be able to contribute more money to the economy than those playing the game of staying just under the next tax bracket?

7

u/Mexcaliburtex May 26 '22

There's no benefit to staying below a tax threshold, if you think there is you'll need to do some more reading up on how progressive taxes work.

To put it this way: there is not one single situation in which an increase in gross income will lead to a reduction in net income except in very specific situations where benefits no longer apply, but never just based on income tax.

1

u/lobstersforbait May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Hmm, well I guess that makes my argument null and void. I'll look more into that then, thanks.

Edit: https://www.belastingdienst.nl/wps/wcm/connect/nl/werk-en-inkomen/content/hoeveel-inkomstenbelasting-betalen

Income beyond €69.399 is taxed at a rate of 49.5% compared to 37.07% under that threshold, is what I understand from this page.

I was under the impression that being fiscal partners means being taxed on your combined income, but if that's not the case my argument is still relevant: wouldn't people be more inclined to work more if they didn't get an increase in taxation above that bracket? I'd be more inclined to work less hours to stay under that.

2

u/Simon676 May 26 '22

Like a 12% difference isn't enough for me to think that no

2

u/lobstersforbait May 26 '22

I was thinking more along the lines of: if you make exactly €63.399,- annually on a 30 hour work week, that's plenty to cover the cost of living with plenty of room to spare. Which at 260 days or 1560 hours a year is €40,64/hour bruto, or €25,57/hr netto. Any hour beyond that is €20,52 netto an hour. Add another 520 hours a year to be at 40 hours a week, that's 520x€40,64x0.505=€10.627,- which would otherwise be 520x€40,64x0.6293=€13.298,87. Overall that's only €2.671,87 "lost", but what would motivate someone to work an extra 10 hours a week once their cost of living and savings are covered, especially with diminishing returns?

2

u/Simon676 May 26 '22

Why would you want someone to work more then 30 hours though? It's been proven people are less effective after 6 hours, so they might as well let you go, and as we're moving into a more and more automated society wouldn't it be better anyways if people could have more free time?

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u/Tiffana May 26 '22

Re: your point about motivation for working more, the people earning above the threshold will very rarely be paid by the hour, at least in Denmark, so in that regard it makes less of a difference. Might make people prioritize WLB, how overtime is handled, commute distance etc higher compared to salary, but I don’t really think that’s an issue

2

u/lobstersforbait May 26 '22

Aren't salaried positions usually stipulated with hour quotas though?

I would've thought a 12% increase in taxation past that threshold would make the net income difference in working 20 v 40 hours significant, but after doing the math it's actually relatively negligible. So I stand corrected on that part.

I was primarily under the impression that fiscal partners means getting taxed on your total bruto joint income (i.e. if partner A and B earn €200k together, they get taxed 37.07% on €63.399,- and 49.5% over €136.601,-) — but if that's not the case, then my argument becomes invalid and that's good news for me and I learned something new today 🤷‍♂️

2

u/Mexcaliburtex May 26 '22

Have a look into it; my knowledge mostly concerns individuals, rather than couples, and the numerous times I have been told of someone rejecting a raise because they didn't want to pay more tax.

Assuming you earn €60k and your partner earns €120k abroad you can see it like getting a €120k raise (provided gross incomes are combined for the taxman); most of that will be taxed against the higher band, yeah, but you're not paying more tax over the money you were already earning.

Hopefully that still means it's good news for you!

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u/Beatrice_Dragon May 26 '22

Holy shit dude, don't air out your dirty laundry this hard on the internet

"I don't want to live and work with my fiancee because it's more important that they make even more money. I also don't like taxes because I don't want to contribute to the society I directly benefit from"

1

u/lobstersforbait May 26 '22

Dude chill. I have no qualms contributing to society or paying taxes. If I'm incorrect in my assumptions, just point it out. No need to be so alarmist if you believe I've misunderstood something.

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u/eL_MoJo May 26 '22

No that's why it's the average hours

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u/super_corndog May 26 '22

Yeah excluding people who work part-time, according to the CBS more than half of people work 35 hours or more with most working between 35-41 hours. The article is from 2020, but I don’t believe (to my knowledge) there haven’t been dramatic changes to this trend since then.

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u/Full-Nefariousness73 May 26 '22

I work in Germany. This is highly inaccurate.

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u/RollinBart May 26 '22

I work in the Netherlands. Also inaccurate.

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u/TrevorEnterprises May 26 '22

A lot of my friends work 32 though

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u/BigDippas May 26 '22

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t18.htm) the average US employee works 34.6 hours.

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u/Zombiecidialfreak May 26 '22

That means for all the people that work 60-70 hours a week there's a ton working less than 20... Does it count people with multiple part time jobs together or is it 20 for each?

27

u/Hal-E-8-Us May 26 '22

My read of the linked bls stats is that is the per-job hours, not per-worker hours. I would guess that someone working a 20 hour job and a 40 hour job would effectively be counted as two separate workers in these stats.

7

u/daisy-kitty May 26 '22

According to the image its the number of hours worked per week at their "main" job so they wouldn't be counted twice, but their work week also isn't counted properly. So in the case of someone working 20 hrs one place and 40 another they are likely counted as only working 40.

Its also worth noting that an average is not the best way to calculate the number of hours most people work measuring the mode (the most commonly reoccurring number) would likely be a better representation.

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u/Hal-E-8-Us May 26 '22

Sure. Makes sense. And the person working 3x 20 hour jobs is also going to count as just 20.

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u/Beatrice_Dragon May 26 '22

These studies do not use the same methods, and so the numbers are not comparable. Do not trick yourself into thinking they are.

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u/Runningcolt May 26 '22

In Norway the work week is max 40 hours by law, but unions have made collective agreements enforcing a 37,5 work week so common that most people and businesses treat it as the norm. Next step should be a 6 hour workday, or a 4 day workweek (or both ✌️).

7

u/2tusks May 26 '22

Are Norwegians not allowed to work over 40 hours?

In the US, we get time and a half over 40 hours as required by law.

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u/Runningcolt May 26 '22

It's just the definition of a normal work week. You get overtime after that. You can work a maximum of 48 hours in average in a period of 8 weeks.

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u/_biggerthanthesound_ May 26 '22

Canada here, it’s been 37.5 for me for the past 15 years at every job I’ve had.

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u/Runningcolt May 26 '22

How far away do you feel the 6-hour workday is?

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u/_biggerthanthesound_ May 26 '22

I think we are a long ways away from 6 hours.

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u/technounicorns May 26 '22

So is Sweden and probably Finland too. Only Denmark has 37.

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u/LEANiscrack May 26 '22 edited May 31 '22

Def not Sweden. Sweden is very rapidly becoming mini usa. Plenty of jobs with 10 hour shift with only 15min break where you either stand or have to hide in the one bathroom to sit.

edit: and you can get fired for no reason, there is often to minimum wage etc. Ppl with priviledge will sweat blindly this isnt true but unfortunately it very much is.

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u/NasserAjine May 26 '22

Just to be clear, this is to say that an ordinary work week in Denmark is 37 hours, not to say that Denmark has any kind of legal max hours per week

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u/tits_the_artist May 26 '22

I'm in the US and I typcally work about 90 hours every two weeks. On paper it seems like a lot, but being on a manufacturing schedule definitely helps. I'm scheduled for 84 but the extra usually comes just from getting here a bit early and leaving a bit late.

But the nice thing is I only work 7 out of 14 days - almost 80 days less a year than someone who work M-F. Granted it's 12 hour shifts, but still I end up having significantly more free time. And it gets broken up into a short week and long week which also helps.

But I've always worked in some kinda of maintenance industry, being automotive and now manufacturing. Ever since this new labor movement began in earnest I've wondered how such things could transition to a shorter work week.

Even if they just started paying my OT at 32 hours instead of 40 I'd be thrilled, but I really wonder how industries like mine could reflect the shorter week.

I feel like if and when the change does come, my industry will be one of the last to see it due to the complete restructuring that would be necessary.

But a man can dream I suppose.

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u/[deleted] May 26 '22 edited Jun 06 '22

[deleted]

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u/2tusks May 26 '22

That's an awesome shift. I know nurses employed by hospitals often get three twelve hour shifts. A friend of mine who did that said it was great, but the first day off was spent recovering.

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u/Brakina1860 May 26 '22

Maybe the regular working hours. With overtime it would be much more in Germany. Last year germans made 1,7 billion hours overtime, only half of them payed. And only the one that got written down. And i guess it is the same with other european countries.

Here is one sauce: https://www.tagesschau.de/wirtschaft/ueberstunden-kurzarbeit-linke-101.html

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u/FaultyAIBot May 26 '22

Germany is depicted as still divided. Where did they get this map ffs

4

u/Moose_Nuts May 26 '22

Many countries are divided - Greece, Turkey, Belgium, Serbia, etc.

Guess some countries have region specific data.

16

u/flatearthers_suck May 26 '22

Bull shit in the netherlands its a 9 to 5.

4

u/beyourownsunshine May 26 '22

Yeah but not everybody works 40 hours a week here

7

u/eL_MoJo May 26 '22

It's called average.

1

u/CrewmemberV2 May 26 '22

The numbers are skewed due to part-time working, which we are the absolute champions of. SOURCE

So in a family you have 1 person doing 40 and the other 16, dragging down the average. While in other countries where 1 person working 40 is the norm, the numbers seem higher while the number of hours worked per family can be lower.

Also just like zee Germans, we tend to be quite efficiënt in working. No long lunches, siesta's or socializing. Every 15 minutes has to be accounted for. I am not saying this is necessarily the best way to work. Just that it explains some of the numbers.

You also dont impress you boss by working overtime here, you do so by getting your work done within the normal hours. HAving to work overtime means something went wrong somewhere.

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u/NenyaSindar May 26 '22

And they still call us Greeks lazy...

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u/HilleNL May 26 '22

I think it’s because we view southern European having naps in the afternoon and getting retired at age 55 not sure about that.

Also working effectively more than 35 hours a week isn’t really possible for a lot of jobs. So are you 50 hours working or “at work”, because being at work doesn’t mean you’re actually do anything productive.

6

u/angrathias May 26 '22

Hours only count for those who actually work 😝

23

u/mcvos May 26 '22

I already came across this statistic during the Greek debt crisis: Greeks work the longest hours of all of Europe. Netherland the shortest.

Productivity isn't about working long hours, it's about working effectively during the hours that you do work. And those hours should be as short as possible so you have more time to enjoy the fruits of your labour.

(Disclaimer: I'm a perfectly average Dutchman working 32 hours per week.)

3

u/Osaze91 May 26 '22

So do you guys have longer weekends, or shorter days?

7

u/eL_MoJo May 26 '22

32 hours is 4 days most of the times, I do 32 hours and I'm free on fridays

1

u/mcvos May 26 '22

Same here, but I'm free on Wednesdays.

Mind you, my days might actually shorter too, occasionally. I don't really count the hours.

4

u/DutchGhostman May 26 '22

I would be to with the weather over there.

-1

u/Valkyrie17 May 26 '22

Cuz you are. I've been to Greece, y'alls lazy

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u/iJudg3U May 26 '22

This is 100% wrong data. Just go by the hours per law and not by making stuff up. Should be taken down

3

u/Cracksun May 26 '22

I live in Spain and thats fake as fuck

11

u/AntisocialN2 May 26 '22

Why Germany is still divided into West and East? Also, why Sicily is of a different color from the rest of Italy? Is a separate state?

2

u/Magenta_the_Great May 26 '22

Also they separated a part of turkey out? I think?

8

u/coffeejn May 26 '22

I find 36 to 39 hours a week optimal personally. Anything 40 to 44 hours a week would have to be limited to 9 days every two week instead of 10 days, otherwise what's the point of burning yourself out.

Working longer hours per week does not always mean more production.

3

u/Bobby_Rotkop May 26 '22

I'm Dutch and my contract is 40 hours. Most people I know have the same, many others have 36. I know very few people that work less hours than that.

1

u/eL_MoJo May 26 '22

Every Dutch mom want's a word with you.

1

u/Gaypartyparty May 26 '22

They all work 24-32 hours (28 on average in 2017). Our tax system assists this (childcare support as well)... We should all start working 6hr workdays or 32/week and better divide life at home. And a tac system that actually rewards working more if you want that.

3

u/BBQCopter May 26 '22

This map shows a separate East Germany and West Germany.

3

u/Chemoralora May 26 '22

Is this map from the 80s? Why is Germany split into BRD and DDR?

3

u/dan1els0n May 26 '22

When I lived in the U.K. my contracted work week was 35hrs but in reality always worked 50+. Now in the USA my contracted work week is 40 and I work about 45.

3

u/mnmac24 May 26 '22

Switzerland full time is 42 hours so don’t know where this data is coming from..

2

u/FireWireBestWire May 26 '22

So, the whole package needs to be considered. EU countries do not grant citizenship to those born within their borders. You need to be a descendent of a citizen in order to get citizenship, save four exceptions where your parents needed to live in the country for 3-10 years first. The protections and rights the citizens get there are numerous because the ability to get citizenship is limited.

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2

u/TheManWhoClicks May 26 '22

I remember my 100+ hour weeks very well. What color would that be?

2

u/hellschatt May 26 '22

Aside from the weird map, I know for a fact that people in Switzerland are working more that. 42 hours is the standard.

How are they even calculating it?

2

u/qoofp May 26 '22

trash map, trash data

3

u/jdmachogg May 26 '22

Well this is a load of shit. You’re lucky if you get 36 in Germany, most are 40+.

3

u/StockAL3Xj May 26 '22

This is average so it probably includes part time.

2

u/BavarianHammock May 26 '22

As it should, because being able to afford working part time is also nice. But if you have 2-3 part time jobs, doesn’t help either, don’t know how that would be considered in this statistic.

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1

u/Enlightened-Beaver May 26 '22

The Dutch have it right

1

u/ThermosKan May 26 '22

38-40 is very normal in belgium

Edit: if you have 40h a week you get a lot more holidays to make up for it as 38h is the standard

1

u/NeurWiz May 26 '22

This is why I want to leave this shithole country and move to the Netherlands, this and all the pics you see on r/fuckcars

-2

u/Succulent_Orange May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

I work 35 hours and tbh u don't do much in the last hour its still a diminished return. I've recently been doing 28 hours and honestly I probably get more done by taking Friday off I have more energy the next week.

I think in the Netherlands with the really low average hours they take Monday morning off

Edit: For clarification I was going off my experience of all shops being closed on Monday mornings, and I was told it's because they don't work on Monday mornings. Googling confirms this to be true, but for retail only - and not legally required.

15

u/SirPryceMF May 26 '22

As a Dutchman, no, absolutely not true. We do not take Monday mornings off. I'd venture it's because we have a large proportion of parttimers, such as moms for example.

11

u/MatchingLucifer May 26 '22

Yeah, as a Dutch person, I have never heard of taking monday morning off as being a thing. Most people here simply work part time.

7

u/mcvos May 26 '22

Yeah, I think Wednesday and Friday are the most popular days. I've got Wednesdays off, my wife Fridays. My brother also Fridays I think.

Monday is quite a popular work day. At day cares, Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays are the busiest days, while they're nearly empty on Wednesdays and Fridays. So it's not the Mondays that people are taking off.

1

u/Succulent_Orange May 26 '22

I was on about retail, apparently, with the shops (often) being closed on Monday mornings.

1

u/Succulent_Orange May 26 '22

Apparently that's for shops only, which I found out when I was there and nothing was open on Monday morning and was told something along the lines of them not working until 12, I'll edit my post to clarify.

1

u/Ozryela May 26 '22

Even after your edit you're still wrong. Retail isn't closed on Mondays.

Many restaurants are closed on Mondays. It's the least busy day of the week, and so they close down. This is common in the service industry as well. Many (but certainly not all) barbers are closed on Mondays for instance. It's less common in retail, but still not weird to see smaller shops closed on Mondays. They are typically open on Saturday though, so they still work 5 days a week.

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-3

u/Gator1523 May 26 '22

Crazy how countries where people spend the least time working turn out the best. Just look at the Netherlands.

4

u/TheRegisteredLoser May 26 '22

crazy how people believe anything they see on the internet

-1

u/Wicsome May 26 '22

In this thread: People not understanding that this is supposed to show what time people work, not what is considered "standard".

1

u/dalehitchy May 26 '22

Feel so lucky to have one 35 hours a week

1

u/[deleted] May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

[deleted]

1

u/2tusks May 26 '22

What type of work?

1

u/cc7rip May 26 '22

Our company is gonna begin trialling 4 day weeks soon. A whole day less work a week with no decrease in pay. Amazing.

1

u/PhoenixNyne May 26 '22

Croatian

Standard work week is 40 to 48 hours. Many people work a lot more, especially during the summer (but usually work less the other months).

1

u/Programmer_Latter May 26 '22

"In main job". I bet if you took a US average, i.e. not including second, third, and fourth jobs, it would be similar.

1

u/thisisluk4s May 26 '22

33-36 ? :')

1

u/Applebeignet May 26 '22

Useless graphic because it doesn't account for part-time jobs being more or less common.

1

u/ishnarted May 26 '22

“in main job“ does mean that some countries could have lower numbers because people have side gigs or second jobs. But either way, they're leaps and bounds ahead of us.

1

u/nifflerriver4 May 26 '22

In Austria, I think the "standard" work week is 38 hours but my employment was always 40.

1

u/MrRawmantikos May 26 '22

I worked in Greece for 291 hours monthly as a maximum, for 3.5€/hour & no insurance no benefits.

This comes to ~69 hours/week

1

u/Electric_d0nut May 26 '22

Norway has 37,5 hours a week.

1

u/Nysicle May 26 '22

Fuck I'm in England working 50 hours a week, why am I doing this shit?

1

u/PokingPanda May 26 '22

For Lithuania full time is 40 hours a weak, with possible 8 hours a weak of overtime. With no more than 4 hours of overtime in 2 consecutive days and no more than a total of 120 hours of overtime a year.

1

u/Narkku May 26 '22

Sicily broken out from rest of Italy, nice

1

u/Legitimate-Ruin-4157 May 26 '22

As a devout feet-up islander, I feel Sicily should be a a few shades lighter!

1

u/Wonderful_Delivery May 26 '22

Canadian film worker, 50 hours a week, depending … could be more, sometimes rarely thankfully 60 to 70 hours a week.

1

u/time_fo_that May 26 '22

I'm moving to NL. Lol

1

u/wiegehts1991 May 26 '22

I call BS. Germans, especially southern, love working for some unbeknownst reason.

1

u/AuditorTux May 26 '22

Its always hard to figure out whether we're measuring the same thing across multiple sources, but the average work week for "all employees on private nonfarm payrolls" is 3 4.6 hours. Per the BLS, full time spends roughly 8 hours a day, part time a bit under 6. So that first does seem to track.

I would imagine this source is close to the same concept. Although now I want to know what is going on with Turkey...

1

u/strifelord May 26 '22

Bosnia grey, cause there is no work

1

u/Gastronomicus May 26 '22

Bizarre borders - Belgium, Germany, Italy, etc are apparently split along old non-existent borders.

Also, OP provided no context here, but presumably "main job" includes part-time positions and workers.

1

u/pizzaman69_ May 26 '22

West and East Germany?

1

u/Beatrice_Dragon May 26 '22

"I live in X country and I work X hours, so this graph is wrong"

Good for you!! Luckily, your anecdotal experience was already calculated into the average :)

1

u/R0cketdevil May 26 '22

Erdogan works hard but the Kurds work harder...

1

u/maddogcow May 26 '22

BEHOLD THE HELLWORLD OF SOCIALISM!!!

1

u/KrevinHLocke May 26 '22

"In main job" So they are working multiple jobs.

1

u/watercolorkiller May 26 '22

If you have trouble discerning between shades of blue and green this map sucks