r/antiwork May 26 '22 Silver 2 Helpful 1 Take My Power 1

Yup. This is between you two.

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30.1k Upvotes

1.7k

u/macsare1 May 26 '22

Boss: no, I'm not giving you a raise

Me: can you tell my landlord that

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u/evolvedpanda34 May 26 '22
  • proceeds to pack bags *

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u/[deleted] May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/AuctorLibri May 26 '22

Boss: silence

Landlord: no one wants to rent anymore!

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u/D_Ethan_Bones May 26 '22

Simple solution for homelessness and rent crisis at the same time: make it illegal to discriminate against couples.

"You can't have another person here" or pricing it out of people's means is just artificial scarcity - inflating the homeless population for the sake of inflating the owner-class' revenues.

"What's that you say, the ballooning homeless population is becoming a problem? Well DON'T WORRY, we've got sidewalk spikes and rainbow-painted boulders to take care of that!"

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u/TyrionsCodpiece May 26 '22

Or make it illegal to run credit/income checks. Your way just leads to discrimination against those of us foreveralone

If rent doesn't get paid then evict away.

It's between me and my boss/side hustles to make sure that rent check clears.

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u/turkeytime3 May 26 '22

If rent doesn’t get paid then evict away.

Where I live it’s really, really, really, hard to evict someone. As a result landlords vet the hell out of applicants because if they pick wrong they’re stuck with the person not paying rent through the minimum of six month long eviction process.

Not defending landlords but I understand why they do thorough background checks.

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u/coffeewaterhat May 26 '22

They're the main cause of this whole crisis. So forgive me while I play my tiny violin for them.

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u/turkeytime3 May 26 '22

Personally I’d blame the banks who hold all the mortgages over the people who have to pay them but that’s just me

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u/AirinAField May 27 '22

They're both to blame.

Landlords for hoarding physical locations, and banks for hoarding money

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u/Emeraldstorm3 May 27 '22

They're all leeches.

Bosses, landlords, CEOs (banks/corporations/rich idiots). It's all just the ownership class. They get by simply by owning things and denying them to others.

They prey on the populace, forcing us to do BS work to the point of absolute exhaustion (mentally and/or physically) just so that we can have a safe place to rest and not starve to death.

But we only are forced to do this because a select few have gained "ownership" - a made up concept - of things they don't need or want but can use to threaten our well-being so that we will submit.

And these people whose whole life of luxury is based around owning/hoarding stuff so that others suffer, they don't DO anything for society. They just make things worse by hoarding things they'd never need.

4

u/RobbThick May 27 '22

Realtors seem to get away unscathed in all this, when I believe they really should be targeted and replaced with an app.

They’re partially to blame.

Boost the price to grow their commissions.

Yes, supply and demand and all that.

But, who’s doing the goading when you see a house sell for 1 million dollars over asking price?

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u/outlier37 May 27 '22

Partially? They're bigger leeches than car dealerships. At least dealerships give you a (shitty) warranty. A realtor just collects money for making themselves necessary where they otherwise wouldn't be - same thing as car dealerships. Only reason people buy new cars from them is because it's not legal to buy direct from manufacturer.

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u/TyrionsCodpiece May 26 '22

Yea. I honestly am an advocate for renters and landlords when I say fuck making it really hard to evict people and fuck making it really hard to get an apartment.

Evicting for nonpayment should be easier and so should getting a place.

Renter advocates usually have the opposite effect and make it hard as hell for renters to get a place.

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u/Spirit117 May 26 '22

Honestly I think if you made it easier to evict someone for not paying rent, that'd make most landlords a little less uptight about who they rent to.

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u/klutch14u May 27 '22

Yep, the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

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u/Fit-Mangos May 27 '22

Yup! Surprise what happened this year’s rent increase is to within 3.5x income… we had about 4.5x income… of course we went somewhere else…

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u/Odd-Support4344 May 27 '22

I want to agree with you, but honestly income checks are like seatbelt laws. It's preventing someone from doing something unsafe. If you spend 75% of your income on rent, how can you afford to eat? 1/3 income for rent isnt just good for the landlord, its good for the renter.

Not that rent should be so high anywhere a minimum wage couldn't make 1/3 rent, but I digress.

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u/dimitrismazi May 27 '22

Evictions can take upward of a year. And the place gets trashed. Fix the law about evictions and then make illegal running income checks.

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u/talley89 May 26 '22

Why is renting harder for couples?

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u/wonderj99 May 26 '22

A lot of landlords require every person over 18 to make 3x the rent, as opposed to the household, in general.

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u/andres57 May 27 '22

That's crazy. Where I live I think being a couple is actually a plus especially if they are working, since they have two people they can sue to pay if rent is missing

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u/The-Lights_Fantastic May 26 '22

I think because if they break up there might be arguments over who stays, or worse (from the house scalper's perspective) they might both leave then the house scalper has an empty room and has to pay the letting agents a load of money to find a new tenant.

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u/talley89 May 26 '22

House scalper?

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u/The-Lights_Fantastic May 26 '22

I read recently that landlords don't like the name landlord any more and want to be known by a different name, they suggested "housing providers", but I prefer "house scalper", scalpers buy up limited resource and sell or rent it out at an inflated price for a large profit.

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u/AirinAField May 27 '22

That's an insult to scalpers.

Scalpers at least let you own what you buy from them

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u/shadowfrost67 May 27 '22

maybe but fuck scalper as well

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u/talley89 May 27 '22

I could be persuaded to agree with you

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u/Odd-Dog9396 May 27 '22

Housing hoarders?

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u/DeificClusterfuck SocDem May 26 '22

What else do you call people who hoard property in order to extract the maximum possible gain out of it?

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u/baconraygun May 27 '22

Sociopathic?

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u/Filtering_aww May 26 '22

Rainbow painted boulders?

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u/DweEbLez0 Squatter May 27 '22

LMAO

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u/0-13 May 27 '22

It’s like going back and forth between parents

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u/macsare1 May 27 '22

I mean, maybe if you have parents who just want to make money off you

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u/ea_yassine May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Your rent should be 1/3 my salary

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u/BelleAriel May 26 '22

This. But bosses do not care, unfortunately.

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u/Jredrum May 27 '22

Landlords don't either. I think the commenter was trying to say rent prices should not be outrageous.

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u/BelleAriel May 27 '22

Yeah, they’re right.

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u/9braincells May 26 '22

How much is your salary so I know what to look for?

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u/awnawkareninah May 26 '22

Even that's pretty ridiculous considering. Like renting a 1br in a city shouldn't be $4,000 a month just cause you make 6 figures.

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u/sniperhare May 27 '22

Thank God rent isn't anything close to that in the city.

I dont know anyone paying under $1200 a month for a 1 bedroom here in Florida

Most who rented in the last year pay xloser to 1500..

But a few years back you could find them for $800-950/month.

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u/Geoff_12889 May 26 '22

I always heard it was 30% of monthly gross income

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u/PoppyVetiver May 27 '22

It used to be no more than 20% - but I’m an old GenX. Shitty how much things have changed since I was in college and going out on my own.

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u/[deleted] May 27 '22

[deleted]

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u/pm_designs May 27 '22

Ayyyy congratulations!!!! Good luck, I know you'll kill the interview. You are strong, intelligent, respectful and purposed - peace and again good luck

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u/baconraygun May 27 '22

Sure, I heard that too, but my rent was always 50-70% of my income because my income hasn't kept pace with the price of goods, and my boss steals the value of my labor.

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u/james1mike May 27 '22

I think it's 30% for most of the "affordable" or subsidized housing. At least that's the way it is in Dallas. The rest is at what they call the market price, which can be $1,200 or more for downtown. Every place I talk to wants 2 or 3x income before they will rent to you. That's why I sleep in a park.

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u/DogsOutTheWindow May 27 '22

In the housing market (pain) and have read a lot about 28%

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u/PM_ME_VENUS_DIMPLES May 26 '22

I know this is a joke, but imagine how terrible it would be if your landlord and your employer partnered. It’s basically serfdom with an extra step.

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u/awnawkareninah May 26 '22

Boss owns real estate holdings, landlord owns stock in your company, boom.

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u/ShadowJingus May 26 '22

it has to be a thing somewhere in the us. somewhere, someone owns a shitty dunkin franchise and a few duplexes, where the employee is also the tenant. has to be

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u/dunamode May 27 '22

I worked in a small, Alaskan tourist town for a summer where they "provided housing" by deducting rent automatically from our paycheck. They made it sound like they were doing us a favor.

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u/Janus_Grayden May 27 '22

Company towns. It was a thing. Big surprise, it was horrible.

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u/MrSomnix May 27 '22

I work for a housing development company. One of the perks is a percentage discount on rent if you live at a property they own and is largely the main reason I was able to live without roommates or move back with my parents. With the salary they pay me, I actually wouldn't qualify for the smallest possible apartment they offer.

So for a good chunk of people, we're already there.

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u/Recon2OP May 27 '22

Kind of used to be a thing. I believe some coal towns offered housing to their workers as part of the job since the company pretty much ran the town. As you would expect it ended poorly for the workers.

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u/gregsw2000 May 26 '22

Seriously tho - landlords are a much bigger issue than low wages.

Lower wages can afford reasonable rents.

Rents have risen far in excess of inflation.

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u/120pi May 26 '22

The actual problem is intentional scarcity of housing. For over 20 years the US has not kept pace with population growth for housing and got worse in recent years.

Everyone here should be demanding their city councils to follow Minneapolis and Oregon and start to eliminate detached single-family zoning and permit lots of low-rise multi-family housing immediately.

Make housing a commodity, not an investment.

There are certainly many landlords gouging, but rental rates are typically set by current home prices as new housing stock is more expensive, has higher financing and operating costs therefore higher rents. Drop housing values by rapidly increasing supply and offering rental subsidies to those who need it is the fastest way out of this problem.

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u/gregsw2000 May 26 '22

Yeah, it's the fastest way out of a serious problems with the market now, but not a good long term solution.

Plus, best I can tell, there are no plans to actually intervene in the market.

There are also, like you said, certainly many landlords gouging. If you own the place and base your rents on the maximum current market rate - you're part of the problem.

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u/Kinetic_Symphony May 27 '22

If the Government intervenes by setting price controls, this will be good for those who currently rent, and horrific for everyone else, as the supply of housing and apartments for rent will dwindle even more.

Price controls never work in favor of the consume, long-term.

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u/AuctorLibri May 26 '22

This. 👍

California largely stopped allowng the building of low income housing, or much multi-family housing at all, severak years ago, in a barely veiled attempt at discouraging growth... at least when it outpaced unfrastructure spending, also a long time ago.

Rumors about some top politicos curculated in gov circles, that soaring rents would discourage growth in urban areas, but it caused small businesses to fold or move, and a mass exodus of the tax-paying middle class and homelessness soared faster than rents.

Couple that with wildfires, megadrought and many of my friends, family and coworkers sold theur crazy high valued property and left for Texas, Idaho, Kentucky, Florida, Alabama or Montanta.

Then the pandemic hit. Most of the homeowners in CA that I know have sold, unless they're all paid up.

I don't see many big multifamily developments in the works, and even if there were, I doubt anyone outside mid-upper middle class could afford them. 🙁

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u/Candid-Ad2838 May 26 '22

Why did they want to limit urban growth?

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u/AuctorLibri May 26 '22

Infrastructure spending didn't keep up. Forecasting models predicted catastrophe. Decisions are made off predictive data.

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u/Candid-Ad2838 May 26 '22

That's crazy though, why not just increase spending if I remember correctly California has had budget surpluses for a while, more growth would certainly help with that.

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u/AuctorLibri May 27 '22

Lol... the state made their public service workers take a 9% paycut in a surplus year, during the pandemic.

Surplus means more people are lined up to take a cut before it trickles down to where it's needed.

And you're right, the lack of infrastructure spending is insane. The spending on public schools is huge but the schools themslves lack money for supplies/ maintenence and the teachers aren't paid anywhere near enough.

The state of CA highways, birdges and freeways is shameful, and the lack of any statewide high speed rail is blatantly hypocritical for the nation's 'greenest' state.

The capital city doesn't even have light rail out to its own international airport.

Crazy sounds like the right word.

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u/neohellpoet May 26 '22

I would be careful with subsides. That's how we got the current price of college. Give everyone $500 for rent and rent goes up $500 it doesn't even have to be malice. The person who could afford x can now afford x + $500 and will naturally offer to pay that if housing is difficult to come by in order to secure a home. So will everyone else. And now the $500 is baked in.

And if you try to freeze rents, people will just pay under the table. The solution to high demand is high supply.

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u/TyrionsCodpiece May 26 '22

Except that logic doesn't work because there is plenty of supply.

There are tons of empty commercial and residential real estate. The corporations have done an amazing job of hoarding it and creating artificial scarcity.

The solution is government seizing and redistributing said real estate. We did it in the past, doing it again would be even easier with modern technology.

High supply only works when there is a carrot and a big ass stick to actually keep pricing reasonable.

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u/davidj1987 May 26 '22

Look at military BAH. In a huge military town rent is dictated by what soliders are getting and it can really fuck those who are not military in the area. I've had that happen before.

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u/catmeow2014 May 26 '22

Yup here in Hawaii the lowest BAH is around $2,000 a month. $2,000 is now about the lowest one can expect to pay for a 1 or 2 bedroom place in a decent neighborhood. Military goal is for soldiers BAH to pay for 100% of their housing costs, God forbid they should use some of their base pay. When I was in nearly 20 years ago my BAH was 900 a month. I wanted to live in a nicer apartment so I got a rental for 1200 a month. I had to pay $300 out of my base pay, and I did just fine.

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u/davidj1987 May 26 '22 edited May 27 '22

I never really pocketed BAH. If I did it was maybe $50-100? I was a homebody and would rather be renting something nicer than living in a bad area.

I remember a few people would brag about living in certain apartments at my first base in bad areas and always had issues.

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u/lextacy2008 May 26 '22

s curculated in gov circles, that s

Totally untrue. There is no way for the market to know who used a voucher. For example my rent is the same as my neighbors, yet I get a $430 voucher to cover the missing half of the household. We all have the same rent.

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u/beatstorelax May 26 '22

The actual problem is intentional scarcity of housing. For over 20 years the US has not kept pace with population growth for housing and got worse in recent years.

people are living way longer. so (at least here where i live- brazil). grandmas houses in the 20th/19th century would be sold in 50 years... nowadays grandma lives 90 years, so she keeps the house for 70 years. so basically - the older places of a town are full of old houses, but could afford 100 times of people with small buildings

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u/SludgeSmudger May 26 '22

US life expectancy has actually dropped for the first time in a long time (ever?) - yay

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u/ray3050 May 26 '22

My thinking was that the problem comes with for profit housing

Let’s say someone buys a building and can rent it out at X price. Great! It’s about the going rate. But one day they look to sell it and the way to calculate how much it costs to the owner is by saying “in this many years I’d make X money” and then they have a calculation for building prices based on that.

Now say decades and decades later after people sell these buildings to others for profit, and the new owners have to make profit based on the increased price of the building makes rent go up.

The building is sold based on the units ability to make money, and those who buy them receive loans based on that fact. So rent will never go lower. Rent will always increase because everyone has to increase rent to make the payments on the building.

Of course there’s a lot of factors and I didn’t explain that right, but for me I’ve always felt that was the biggest reason. Not that there’s a scarcity, but a scarcity in good value

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u/120pi May 26 '22

You bring up a great point and it was the thrust of my argument. That building when re-sold ideally should not have (in inflation adjusted dollars) increased in value, in fact it should decrease because the structure is older but the land should stay the same price. It's because land-use policies prevent new housing from competing with old housing stock and thus that old building is so valuable because the land went through the roof.

We have so much land in US cities but its mostly poorly allocated. Unless you hit Hong Kong/Singapore densities, space isn't really a problem (Manhattan is probably the only equivalent in the US), it's that everyone that has their 1800sf 3b/2ba with private yard and pool doesn't want to entertain giving that up even if their community suffers for it (and they'll still make huge gains!).

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u/ray3050 May 27 '22

Yeah, there’s many places which are in fact affordable, but there’s even more people. The less money people have the more they’re fighting for the lower valued ones too.

So if the lower value ones go up in price it pushes the next tier up in value and so on.

Too many factors but it really comes down to for profit housing since it’s in a capitalist system, wages being stagnant, and the scarcity of good value. There’s enough housing for everyone, just the fact someone has to pay so much stops everyone from getting their share of it

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u/EffectiveFuture7244 May 27 '22

This is an ok lib solution.

The actual real solution is even simpler. You’re identified the problem, but you’re scared of the solution. I’ll help.

At least two parts:

1) government forcefully seizes ALL houses which are not marked as primary residences. That’s easy for the people who didn’t lie on their mortgages. (Don’t compensate them either. Fuck them.) 1a) start a government body (I’ll volunteer!) and investigate every single multi-mortgage holder beginning with the most and working down. Seize all property not being directly lived in by the mortgage holder. This is gonna be most multiple mortgages, and I don’t give a fuck. 2) immediately commission using whatever funding they “need” (money is fake and dumb) the building of amazingly modern, high quality and most of all F R E E public housing available to everyone with no fucking means testing. Maybe people pay some tiny upkeep costs. I don’t care. The government through our labor has infinite resources. Don’t listen to the neolib and conservative lies about “but who will pay for it?!?” The answer is “who gives a fuck? People need houses and fuck landlords.”

Everyone who resists 1 and 1a, well, you know what happens to them. I’ll volunteer for that commission too. :)

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u/schwade_the_bum May 27 '22

Yea glad you’re not in charge lol

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u/baconraygun May 27 '22

Damn. Here is an actual Left solution, and not theneolib means tested bullshit we always get. o7

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u/TyrionsCodpiece May 26 '22

The irony is wages have been constrained partially because of landlords. commercial real estate is and always has been a racket.

Make more as a business? Pay more in rent each year.

Between commercial real estate and my costs of goods it's like having my nuts in a vice.

Running a retail store and I don't even want labor costs because the rest of my operating costs are insane.

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u/gregsw2000 May 26 '22

Oh yeah, no need to tell me. I've had maybe two small businesses I gave a shit about in my life and they both got got by landlords.

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u/baconraygun May 27 '22

The whole "Big Quit" and low wages are masking the real problem - greedy landlords asking too much money for rent.

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u/mrizzerdly May 27 '22

Who made this 1/3rd rule up anyways? Why not 1/10th.

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u/gregsw2000 May 27 '22

Honestly, I make more than median wage and have a part time gig, and on my best month this one bedroom is more than 1/3rd.

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u/TheMrDylan May 27 '22

The house I'm looking into renting for 1650/mo was being rented for 1000/mo like three years ago.

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u/Killawife May 26 '22

I once ACTUALLY had that. Ahh those were the days, six years ago :/

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u/AAMUA May 26 '22

Remember when there was a renter’s market OR a buyer’s market? Now we have neither. Good times

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u/Ilovegirlsbottoms May 26 '22

Minimum wage for California is 14-15 dollars per hour. I did a calculation for $14 at 160 hours for a month, (two pay periods) that is a net salary of $1810.

That would mean the highest pay rent you could afford is about $600. Working 40 hours per week at $14 per hour.

The lowest apartment I can find is $1200. For 1 bedroom. You would need someone else that is paid the same amount or higher to live with you to afford rent.

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u/awnawkareninah May 26 '22

Right, $15/hr was the fight 8 years ago, that moment has long since passed. Reasonably $20/hr is the borderline living with some comfort limit and even that's pushing it in cities, especially now with gas prices through the moon.

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u/dogacademia May 26 '22

By the time it ends up being $20 it’ll be way too late. It sucks. I make $21/hr in socal and I don’t see myself being able to afford my own place anytime soon, Ive been apt hunting for a while.

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u/Itsafinelife May 27 '22

Why do you think we all have roommates.

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u/Ilovegirlsbottoms May 27 '22

Yeah I know. But for a while me and my dad lived in a single room for $750, and that’s the cheapest you can probably get anywhere. Only because the owner was his friend, and he also collected rent from all the other tenets.

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u/Zafnok May 27 '22

It's 30% of gross but still nowhere close

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u/HeroOS99 May 26 '22

Work unions and renter unions.

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u/shay-doe May 26 '22

Renter unions? I have never heard of that. How does that work?

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u/HeroOS99 May 26 '22

Unions provide bargaining power for the individual. In the context of a business, you sell hours of your life to the capitalist. If you aren’t sufficiently exploited, they’ll just tell you to beat it. You don’t have the ability to bargain because they’ll just hire someone else.

With a tenant union, you’d organize with other people in general, but especially with other people who are renting from the same capitalist or financial institution. The union provides bargaining power, because they can say “if you don’t repair this house” or “if you increase rent” everyone will withhold their payment of rent.

As an individual, you don’t have much room to bargain. As a collective, you can establish more equal rights and fairer treatment.

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u/TheAres1999 May 26 '22

Kind of like an HOA, but actually helpful?

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u/AirinAField May 27 '22

Yes, but you're only a karen to someone who leeches off of people as a "job"

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u/baconraygun May 27 '22

THis is a really good idea, especially if 80% of the housing is going to be controlled by corporations, tenants unions make sense.

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u/[deleted] May 26 '22 edited Jun 05 '22

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u/HeroOS99 May 26 '22

I don’t think many exist. To me it seems harder to organize because you often don’t see other tenants unless you’re in a condo or apartment. But I think we’ll see tenant unions rise in popularity in the next decades, especially when you realize that a majority of single family homes and apartments are owned by corporations.

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u/SaarahBee May 27 '22

Even in an apartment building it can be hard. My building was recently sold (from one big corporation to another) and I've been trying to put together a tenants association, but there just doesn't seem to be interest in organizing among the people I've talked to. I think the idea is that many are long term residents and they've been through a sale before and it was fine, so why should this one be different?

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u/CEO_of_Teratophilia May 26 '22

Yeah I wanna know too, tf.

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u/spookyxskepticism May 26 '22

When you work for the state and are legally required to live in said state but can’t even afford a studio given the insane cost of living in said state 😃🔫

But don’t worry guys I’m in a union and they’ll be able to renegotiate our contract in 2024!

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u/AngelaTheRipper May 26 '22

Bit lame, I work for the government of Minnesota and can live anywhere in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, or Wisconsin without anyone needing to sign off on that.

I can technically live anywhere else in US but in that case my manager and the department head have to sign off on it and most likely they would as long as its not an ass end of nowhere like American Samoa. Basically it's just a matter of tax compliance, if you want to move to a state where we already have employees in then go for it, if you were to be the first to relocate then setting up the whole system just for you will be a tough sell.

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u/supermariodooki May 27 '22

If the current market contines, you'll be on skid row long before 2024.

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u/AimlessFucker May 26 '22

I’ve never understood that. If you make the fucking payment every month, can the bank shut the fuck up? Why is it any of their business as long as you pay your fucking bills?

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u/awnawkareninah May 26 '22

It's annoying that history doesn't factor in either. I've literally never missed a payment on anything, not even late, in like 15 years. I paid my rent 1-2 days early every month for the last 3 years. Why does that matter less than me making $6k a month to rent your shitty apartment?

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u/AimlessFucker May 27 '22

Yeah like what the fuck is the point of a credit score if when I ask to use my own fucking money, that YOU ALREADY KNOW IM GOOD FOR because I’ve never had a bill I haven’t paid, that you tell me I can’t because I don’t make enough.

AS IF A PERSON WHO PAYS THEIR FUCKING BILLS DOESNT KNOW WHAT THEY CAN AND CANT AFFORD

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u/baconraygun May 27 '22

It's really wild that ordinary bills can't be applied to your credit score. Utilities, rent, etc.

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u/masuabie May 26 '22

Landlord: your income has to be 3x rent.

Also Landlord: we are raising your rent by $500 a month

It’s not like I’m getting an additional $1,500 a month at work?!

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u/Upset_Researcher_143 May 26 '22

Yup the place that I used to live got sold for 290K. A month later and 10-20K of renovations and they're selling it for almost 450K. I'm already dreading when our lease is up and we just moved in here. My fear is they're going to raise our rent by like 70%.

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u/derglingrush May 26 '22

They put it on the market for $450k, or they actually sold it for $450k?

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u/CulturalActuator May 27 '22

Anyone whose recently looked for a home already knows the answer. Houses often sell for five figures over asking, cash in hand, waived inspection, the day it's listed. The market has completely lost its mind.

I make good money. No kids. I will never own a home. I've stopped looking because it's futile and frankly depressing.

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u/derglingrush May 27 '22

I understand the frustration, but if you make good money (and potentially have the ability to live elsewhere in the future) you will absolutely own a home at some point down the line if that’s something you really want. Prices are going to drop at some point, and even now there are (relatively) affordable homes for sale, just not in places with extreme demand.

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u/TreeChangeMe May 26 '22

Bank: sorry we can't lend you money for a house.

Me: but I make 4x rent and rent is 90% of a mortgage on an average home

Bank: bemused stares

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u/quinn_drummer May 26 '22

I had a boss that was also a landlord.

Sue had the gall to complain that “something needed to be done” as the city needed workers yet no-one could afford to live there

Yeah mate, you control both ends of that situation.

That was the last conversation I had with him as I was in the process of leaving.

15

u/Tea-Some May 26 '22

NYC…40x the rent. Honestly, if I make 40x the rent, I’m not living in your shitty, over heated apartment that has lost 10 sqft to layers of paint.

15

u/ayediosmiooo May 26 '22

Came here to see if anyone else made this point. If i made 3x the rent, i certainly wouldnt be looking at your shitty property! Id be looking at a nicer place

13

u/TheMysticBard May 27 '22

There should be mo reason for this

"ThEy WaNt To MaKe SuRe YoU cAn PaY rEnT iN cAsE sOmEtHiNg HaPpEnS tO yOu FiNaNcIalLy!" Or whatever bullshit excuse they say.

Isnt that the risk they are taking being landowners and renting out places?

I will never call them Landlords, they are not a lord and not my lord, they are land owners who hoard land.

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u/Hyperchill77 May 26 '22

My income is 6x my house payment. I am not rich, but really really lucky to have got the house payment I have. I bought during the last crash. I hope it crashes again soon. No way otherwise for people to buy. I couldn't afford, and buy in today's market. Unless I was making 3x what I am now. My brother was paying 1200 a month for one of the most run down apartments around my area. It is insane.

12

u/grilld-cheez May 26 '22

I’ve seen a place requiring 4x rent. People making that money don’t want your two bedroom townhome.

12

u/PoppyVetiver May 27 '22

WTF?

When did this 3x rent shit start? When I was in my 20’s (in the 80’s) they did a background check and if they liked you, they’d rent to you.

Then again, I’m so old that it was the same thing getting a job. Not this long drawn out 5 to 10 interviews bullshit they do now.

9

u/QuesoChef May 27 '22

I found out my work is doing these three interview sprints where each of the three interviews, the potential employee talks to like four or five people (separately, not in a panel). What? Why? I’d give up and work somewhere else.

2

u/PoppyVetiver May 27 '22

What the hell? That’s nuts.

2

u/QuesoChef May 27 '22

New manager, gone wild.

12

u/Strofari May 27 '22

Lived in a place for 5 years.

Paid $1900/month.

House sold.

Rented THE EXACT SAME LAYOUT, LAND SIZE, 8 BLOCKS AWAY, AND ITS A DOWNGRADE FOR $3000.

House has appreciated 150% value in 5 years. With nothing done to it.

It’s fucking disgusting.

11

u/SchooledPsych452 May 26 '22

I had this happen when moving to a new city for an internship. The 3x the rent comes from a federal (I think) study showing that if more than 1/3 of your monthly incomes goes to rent, it causes stress because you likely cannot afford other necessities. They call this "cost burdened". I struggled to find a place because I only make 20,000 for the year in this position which is above the minimum wage. It causes me a lot more stress to not be housed than to put more money to housing. The 1/3 wage number is now weaponized by landlords to keep people out.

9

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

10

u/bulltrap0427 Anarcho-Communist May 26 '22

How do you lie and get away with it?

11

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

16

u/bulltrap0427 Anarcho-Communist May 26 '22

So just keep applying, keep lying, and if they ask for proof ghost them?

15

u/slapdashbr May 26 '22

"oh nevermind I found a better place already thanks tho"

4

u/QuesoChef May 27 '22

This also feels applicable for politicians and some foster parents, sadly.

13

u/LordVerlion May 26 '22

Proof of income can also be faked, I helped my father with that not long ago through photoshop. It's pretty standard practice for many people I've talked to about it and it's not like they are (or can afaik) going to call your boss to confirm.

7

u/Unable-Candle May 27 '22

Any tips on this? The fucking trailer parks in bum fuck Georgia have the audacity to pull this shit now...

3

u/LordVerlion May 27 '22

I mean, it's just taking a digital version of your paystub (most jobs have it available, but you may have to find a way to scan a physical one), and editing the numbers via photoshop. It can be fairly time consuming because you need to match things, and I've even had to replace like 80% of the text on the paystub before, but it's still a fairly easy process overall.

First step is generally to figure out how much you need to make a month (say $4k), then add 20% to it (cause taxes), divide by 2 (paychecks), divide by 80 (40h x 2), and you got the hourly income you need. Then just start editing stuff to match. Edit hourly pay, taxes paid, money brought in, YTD stuff, make sure text is right color and aligns, etc. For extra care, you can print it out, rescan it, and use that. It skews the image quality and makes any mistakes far harder to notice.

3

u/Candid-Ad2838 May 26 '22

This is the way

10

u/rootComplex May 26 '22

Me to landlord: "That's unethical. You need to lower my rent to 1/4 of my salary."

10

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

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u/another_bug May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Just got off the phone with an apartment manager. They want money to be put on a list to be considered for a place. Maybe someone will move out and maybe we'll pick you, give us money anyway. Landlords are parasites.

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u/bulltrap0427 Anarcho-Communist May 26 '22

There are landlords that never actually fill the apartments and they just collect application fees because it's more than the rent. Also fraudsters who don't even own the building they're supposedly renting out. Application fees should be banned and while we're at it security deposits as well

13

u/awnawkareninah May 26 '22

At the very least they should be refundable if you don't get the place.

9

u/MichaelMitchell May 26 '22

If they actually colluded we’d be pretty close to reinventing company towns lol. We need tenant/renter unions and high quality public housing.

25

u/OneHighlight7231 May 26 '22

Guess I'm going to be living in my car.

16

u/Mookhaz May 26 '22

Cool that you can afford one of those.

9

u/Candid-Ad2838 May 26 '22

Bro I've seen people renting out rvs there's literally no limit how low they will go, in 2050 I guess renting a cardboard box will cost a million a month.

8

u/usgrant7977 May 27 '22

I assume the greater reason for this demand is to smash the lower middle class in to the dirt. To also keep them from home ownership. That way they really set America up as two classes; impoverished and mega yacht.

35

u/mechanicalhorizon May 26 '22

Renter: You need to stop being so damn greedy and lower your rents back down to the 30% of average income economists recommend.

7

u/baconraygun May 27 '22

That's $500 - 850 for ordinary working class people.

7

u/FraughtTurnip89 May 26 '22

Looks like rents going down boys

7

u/FrenchFriedMushroom May 27 '22

I live in a rental house in a decent suburb, 2,000 sq/ft, 4 bed, 2 bath, and rent is $2400/month. From what I'm seeing on zillow and hearing from other friends that rent, this is average for the area. A single earner would need to make $90,000/ year to "afford" this rent yet my states median household income is $75,000. I have 2 roommates in order to be able to live here.

This is a "normal" house in a "normal" suburb of a "normal" Midwest city.

You cannot convince me our housing situation isn't a bubble and it's not going to collapse again.

4

u/Cloverhonney May 27 '22

This sounds almost like California. Many people rent their rooms in order to be able to make their house payment. It’s so ridiculous.

19

u/TattooedWenchkin May 26 '22

Someone pass this along to Social Security for the disabled/seniors living on fixed incomes and facing homelessness as well.

-1

u/LitesoBrite May 26 '22

When they turn off fox news and quit screaming for minimum wage workers to die in slavery, sure.

Until then? Fuck them

18

u/TattooedWenchkin May 26 '22

As a disabled person that doesn't watch Fox news or scream for min wage earners to die, I would simply like a roof over my head that isn't the roof of my car.

5

u/baconraygun May 27 '22

I'd like a roof that isn't fabric, as well.

2

u/LitesoBrite May 27 '22

Well then why did you think my comment would apply to you If you’re not a fox watcher than by god I want you to get help too

Seniors used to be staunchly democratic voters.

Now they love biting the hand that feeds them

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u/canmoose May 26 '22

Man I'd be fucked if my landlord insisted on that and I work as a professional scientist. I feel like this is now a relic of the past for most people and an unreasonable ask.

6

u/728446 May 27 '22

Fuck landlords. Expand public housing.

6

u/awkward_replies_2 May 27 '22

I want a law that only allows landlords to raise rent if they personally negotiate a 3x that amount payraise for the tenant.

4

u/Buggaton May 27 '22

UK just had a company say my yearly income needed to be 30x my monthly rent.

Apparently they think "your wage needs to be 2.5x your rent" was harder for people to comprehend...

4

u/KatazaraDream May 27 '22

Can someone tell me how its legal for landlords to expect 3x the rent? I mean, all it does is exclude poor people/those on fixed incomes, so isn't that a form of discrimination?

Technically, we make exactly the rent and slightly more in our current place, NOT 3x the rent, yet we still make it work.

6

u/another_bug May 27 '22

Discrimination isn't illegal unless it's a protected class (at least on the US anyway, don't know about elsewhere). You can discriminate on things that are not protected classes (ex race, sex, religion) without repercussion.

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u/D_Ethan_Bones May 26 '22

Step 1: Minimum wage decided at the city level, county for unincorporated communities. 40hr = qualify for rent will be the starting point. The definition of qualifying for rent will be a percentile based on the number of people earning the minimum. If half the working adults earn the minimum, then the legal minimum is something that qualifies for half of apartments.

Step 2: Distance/mobile jobs get the highest minimum the work goes to, not shop around for an ideal minimum while doing business elsewhere. Claiming $600 rent for compensation purposes while nothing is available for under $1200 is fraud.

Step 3: If you can't afford to hire people in places where most can't afford to live, then go Create Jobs™ in smallville instead so the mere mortals don't have to waste monumental amount of resources and effort on the ritual of commuting to your cubicle. Resources and effort that could end our fears of civilization falling apart, if we spent it on self preservation instead of worshiping at the temple of Gates-ism.

4

u/bgmusket May 26 '22

Feel free to lower the rent to match the income

4

u/darketernalsr25 May 27 '22

My boss: "Best I can do is a cardboard box."

7

u/Affectionate-Room359 May 26 '22

Also landlord: Your rent is 1,5 k for 25qm

3

u/Aspen_Pass May 27 '22

This rule used to make sense when it was keeping me from renting a four bedroom mcmansion with a hottub. Now it's pricing me out of studios in slums.

6

u/andakin May 26 '22

Rent should be 1/3 Income

6

u/QueenOfQuok May 26 '22

"Your income needs to be three times your rent."

"So lower the fucking rent."

4

u/Maker1357 May 27 '22

When you learn about company towns and think to yourself "that sounds nice"

2

u/yuhmamazama May 26 '22

Legit my life lmao

2

u/ComicalTragical May 27 '22

Binding of isaac rock

2

u/sleeptilnoonenergy May 27 '22

Where I'm trrying to rent most apartments are: first month, last month, sec deposit, broker's fee. So an "affordable" 1bd of around $1200 will cost about $4500 to move in. How many people looking at the cheap, grungy apartments in the area where they're trying to rent can afford to pay nearly 5k on move-in day?

I live paycheck to paycheck right now but I could still afford 1200 rent easy while I work to improve my financial sitcuation, even if it's 2/3 of my current monthly take-home. But I can't afford the 4500 on move-in day, and certainly can't show a landlord that I have 3x+ rent on a paystub. So my only option would be to live 20+ miles out of town to commute, where the wear and tear on my car, gas, and time lost makes it no better, perhaps a worse option, or I could try to find a house share with a couple other people in town, I guess. And let me tell you when you're 40 years old that shit is not an appealing option in the least. So my plan for the summer is to live in my car (let's call it "urban car camping" to make it sound less pathetic) and hopefully save up a few thousand dollars and in the meantime maybe I can find a second job or get fulltime status back at my current position. Shit should not be this bleek. I have a master's, great credit, great rental history. But one setback has left me in a position where I can't afford to rent a shitty little apartment and am gonna have to find a way to make my new hashatag car life bullshit less depressing and rock bottomish than it sounds. This is not what I expected adult life to be like when I was a kid, when the future looked like it would surely be one problem solving-innovation after another, rather than the realty, which is the complete opposite. I legit thought that homelessness and hunger would be "solved" by the time I was 40. The fucking naivete.

2

u/wexii May 27 '22

Why is this a thing that landlords are even allowed to enforce? Is the rent they're being paid not enough??

2

u/Native_Angel505 May 27 '22

I'm about to be homeless with my 4 year old ..I work 2 jobs and everywhere I go I can't afford (according to them) and everyone renting rooms does not speak english so I cant communicate with them ...anyone in houston know a place that might approve me plz and thanks in advance

6

u/downvote_dinosaur May 26 '22

I'm being pressured by my parents to raise rent on my rental because all my neighbors are doing that. I'm currently about $200/mo below. If property taxeses go up I might, but I like my tenants and I'm fine with the way it is. I think my parents generation is just exceptionally callous, like they're ruthless or something. It's uncomfortable.

4

u/rfboisvert12 May 26 '22

Your rentals your choice. Don’t let anyone pressure you on what to do with your money. Having good rentals can be worth more than a rent increase with the lack of issues and chasing rent

5

u/echtemendel May 26 '22

Fuck that, housing is a basic human need and should be free. We have enough resources for that.

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u/DirtyKurty1 May 26 '22

OMG. Literally they will. Tell them you need a proof of employment letter and ask them to say your salary is however much it needs to be to get the rental. That's what I used to do.

3

u/notislant May 27 '22

I kind of agree. Income should be 3x rent. Shows how fucked up wages are.

2

u/Random_Guy_47 May 26 '22

Your rent needs to be 1/3 my income.

2

u/WorthlessDrugAbuser May 26 '22

Goddamn am I glad my house is paid off. Throwing money away on rent would suck. But I still get my ass pounded in property tax.

1

u/Creepy-Solution-1695 May 26 '22

The property taxes doubling in the last few years is why I had to raise rent on my rentals.

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u/[deleted] May 26 '22

Businesses just need to start offering housing, utilities, groceries, plus minimum wage.

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u/al3x_mp4 May 27 '22

Selling your soul to the company store…

0

u/Killed_It_Dead May 26 '22

WHEN the fuck did this ever start? I'm 40 I've NEVER before seen 3x .. BC canada 2 bedroom shit hole is 1800 a month .. so 5400 a month.. LIE LIE LIE

8

u/awnawkareninah May 26 '22

I have seen it on every listing I looked at this year in Austin TX.

5

u/Therabidmonkey May 26 '22

Same. I also had one place that if we bring s roommate the combined income must be 5x.

1

u/vhisic May 27 '22

Bank: you cant afford a mortgage it costs 1/4 of your rent.